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A film about Morsi, Sisi and Egypt - Is it too early?

Without much publicity, we have now come to know that an Egyptian film will be released in May, dealing with the details of the relationship between the Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian army, the two major events that shook the country of Canaan, and all the cataclysmic milestones experienced by Egypt from January 2011 until June 2013.

The film was titled “Days of Rage and Revolution”, and then changed to “Very Confidential”. The cast is spectacular to say the least, from the professional scriptwriter Wahid Hamid, the man behind Al-Gama'a series in its two parts, and a tremendous record of filmmaking. Then we have a series of stars such as Mahmoud Hamida, Ahmed Saqqa, Mohammed Ramadan, Khaled Al-Sawi, Nabil Al-Halafawi, Ahmed Rizk and Abdel-Aziz Makhion. The movie is produced by businessman and media figure Ahmed Abou Hashima with Kamel Abu Zekri.

The characters of the current president, Abdul Fattah al-Sisi and the man behind the Brotherhood, Khairat al-Shater, will be characterized in the film, as well as the head of the military council, Marshal Hussein Tantawi, and of course the isolated president Mohamed Morsi, the western wall for the Muslim Brotherhood.

Is it too early to produce a film without much perspective, especially since the events tackled in this picture are still playing out in the current state of affairs? Can the audience really watch this movie without being blindsided?

Mashari Althaydi


Is it too early to produce a film without much perspective, especially since the events tackled in this picture are still playing out in the current state of affairs? Can the audience really watch this movie without being blindsided?

Or are we always supposed to wait years before reading a novel or watching a film about historic events? 

Lack of perspective 

It is common that the literature tackling major events turn out to be biased for a lack of perspective. Then these sentiments cool off, allowing for a more scrutiny and enduring study.

As such, the far away we move back in history, the more we become objective. Nevertheless, this is not a static law, nor a moral one. We are faced with a constant flow of emotional writings today about the era of Nasser, both in favor and against him, despite his passing half a century ago. The same thing is true when dealing with influential figures such as The Leader Abdul Karim Qasim and Nuri al Said in Iraq.

Egyptian creativity and art is overwhelmingly rich with the political, social and artistic history of Egypt. There are dozens of works of art about the great personalities, not only in politics but in art and public affairs, such as Taha Hussein and Jamal al-Din al-Afghani.

The rest of the world, especially in the Arabian Peninsula, don’t have any theatrical or dramatic work except for a few, such as the work of the Kuwaiti novelist Ismail Fahad Ismail about the famous poet Muhammad ibn Laboun.

But Egypt on the other hand has always been a leader in this field.

This article is also available in Arabic.
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Saudi journalist Mashari Althaydi presents Al Arabiya News Channel’s “views on the news” daily show “Maraya.” He has previously held the position of a managing senior editor for Saudi Arabia & Gulf region at pan-Arab newspaper Asharq al-Awsat. Althaydi has published several papers on political Islam and social history of Saudi Arabia. He appears as a guest on several radio and television programs to discuss the ideologies of extremist groups and terrorists. He tweets under @MAlthaydy.

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Last Update: Saturday, 13 January 2018 KSA 14:56 - GMT 11:56
Disclaimer: Views expressed by writers in this section are their own and do not reflect Al Arabiya English's point-of-view.
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