Russia may ease Muslim Brotherhood ban to boost Egypt ties

Published: Updated:
Read Mode
100% Font Size
4 min read

“As far as I know, Minister Lavrov wants to ‘delist’ it (the Muslim Brotherhood),” said Alexei Grishin, head of the Religion & Society think tank who used to be a presidential adviser on Islam.

“Any fresh decision by the Supreme Court would be a very lengthy procedure, so maybe what can be done is to restrict the blacklisted Muslim Brotherhood only to the faction that fought in Russia, in the Caucasus, for example,” he told Reuters.

Russia’s Supreme Court and anti-terrorist committee were not available for comment. The Foreign Ministry declined immediate comment.

The Arab world’s biggest nation is engulfed in a prolonged political crisis nearly two years after the fall of Mubarak that pits Mursi’s Islamist supporters against liberal, secular and Christian opposition groups.

“Nobody really knows what will come out of this, but Egypt is such an important country that no matter what we think of its new authorities, we need to have a dialogue,” said Fyodor Lukyanov, a prominent foreign policy analyst.

“It makes sense for Russia to make a bet on Egypt, or at least seek ties with them very actively. So I think they will soon solve the issue with the Muslim Brotherhood in Russia.”

In Egypt, a Muslim Brotherhood spokesman said the ban on the group in Russia was “a very bad thing” and made clear any real improvement in ties was unlikely before that was settled.

“Our leader (the head of the Brotherhood group) had mentioned that issue to the Russian ambassador in Cairo during a joint meeting where he told the ambassador: ‘How come you are asking to have a strong relationship with us while you see as a terrorist group?’,” spokesman Mahmoud Ghozlan said.

Top Content Trending