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Syrian regime intentionally burn Daraa houses: residents

Published: Updated:

Residents of Daraa say their houses have been burned intentionally by the Syrian regime and their supports, reported Al Arabiya correspondent Rima Maktabi.

Maktabi met personally with the residents from this Daraa village to get the scoop.

The southern city of Daraa, is what most people call the cradle of the revolution after at least 15 children were arrested for painting anti-government graffiti on walls of a school.

Today, however, burned down houses is what can be seen throughout the Daraa villages. Residents say these buildings did not catch fire due to heavy shelling, they were intentionally torched by Syrian regime forces.


Streets and homes are left idle as many of their wealthy residents fled the neighborhood of Houran following clashes. Many work in Gulf countries or have fled to refugee camps in neighboring countries like Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon.

“What shall we do? Where shall we go? To the camps, displacement is a source of bitterness and fatigue. Staying here is better than leaving. Isn’t it better?” said a resident.

A number of Syrian families told Al Arabiya that they prefer to remain in their homes despite the risk factors.

At the end of a residential street is a regime security forces camp where snipers are allegedly targeting pedestrians.

But, despite these potential dangers, children still continue to play in neighborhood streets.

Destroyed buildings and mosques is what is left in Syria’s besieged city of Daraa after heavy shelling and ensued fighting between government and opposition forces rocked the city. The remaining walls are what tells the story of the revolution through graffiti.

“[Syrian President Bashar] Al-Assad burned al-Karak,” one wall reads, while another said, “Assad or no one.”

As the tales of tragedy are strewn across the walls of destroyed houses, an elderly resident, Umm Atef greets rebels, kisses her grandchildren always knowing that death may strike again.

A few days earlier a boy was abducted by regime forces, she mourns his death.

“The men, what should I tell you? One is been away for a year and we don’t know where he is, only God knows if he’s dead or alive. One was killed, and he’s a martyr,” Umm Atef said. “May God comfort every mother, my child,” she added.

Tafs, al-Mazareeb, Tell Shihab, along with other villages in the Daraa Governorate show similar destruction, idle streets and flattened buildings.