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Sudanese Christian-convert rearrested

Meriam Ibrahim was on death row after being convicted of apostasy for marrying a Christian in 2011

Published: Updated:

Meriam Ibrahim, a Sudanese Christian who was re-arrested on Tuesday, hours after her release from the death row, was sent to a police station in Khartoum for questioning over providing forged information, her lawyer said.

Her lawyer, Mohaned Mostafa, told Reuters he was with her at the police station and the police wanted to question her about providing forged information. He was unable to immediately provide further details.

Earlier, shortly after being released from prison after a court cancelled her death sentence was arrested Tuesday at Khartoum airport, a source familiar with the incident said, according to Agence France-Presse.

"The National Security took her and Daniel," said the source, referring to Meriam Ibrahim, 27, and her American husband Daniel Wani.

The status of their two young children, one a newborn baby, was not immediately known.

On Monday, the first picture of the freed woman, in which she appeared smiling and celebrating her freedom after the cancellation of her death sentence by the Court of Cassation the was revealed.

The 27-year-old, whose father was Muslim but who was raised by her Christian mother, was convicted of apostasy for marrying a Christian in 2011.

Hardwireglobal.org
Hardwireglobal.org

The Sudanese penal code criminalizes the conversion of Muslims to other religions, a crime punishable by death.

Ibrahim, which was snapped at the safe house where she is hiding out, appeared surrounded by her husband Daniel Wani, her two sons and the couple's legal team around them.

Ibrahim was sentenced to death for “apostasy” last month by a Khartoum court for allegedly converting to Christianity from Islam
Ibrahim was sentenced to death for “apostasy” last month by a Khartoum court for allegedly converting to Christianity from Islam

The sentence drew international criticism, with Amnesty International calling it “abhorrent,” while the U.S. State Department said it was “deeply disturbed” by the sentence and urged the Sudanese government to respect religious freedoms.

Meriam Ibrahim married a Christian man from southern Sudan in a church ceremony in 2011. (Photo courtesy of The Telegraph)
Meriam Ibrahim married a Christian man from southern Sudan in a church ceremony in 2011. (Photo courtesy of The Telegraph)

Sudan introduced Islamic Shariah law in the early 1980s under the rule of autocrat Jaafar Nimeiri, a move that contributed to the resumption of an insurgency in the mostly animist and Christian south of Sudan. The south seceded in 2011 to become the world's newest nation, South Sudan.

Sudanese President Omar Bashir, an Islamist who seized power in a 1989 military coup, has said his country will implement Islam more strictly now that the non-Muslim south is gone.

(With AFP and Reuters)