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Riyadh Agreement set to be implemented in Yemen, 24-member government formed: SPA

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All necessary arrangements have been made to implement a power-sharing agreement in the south of war-torn Yemen, the official Saudi Press Agency reported on Thursday, citing an Arab Coalition source.

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Talks on the peace-sharing agreement, known as the Riyadh Agreement, had stalled in August as the southern-separatist movement, the Southern Transitional Council, suspended their participation.

Now, an agreement may be on the horizon, as all necessary arrangements have been completed to accelerate the implementation of the Riyadh Agreement in Yemen, SPA reported.

The Riyadh Agreement – if adopted – would set up a power-sharing structure between the Southern Transitional Council and the Yemeni government, consisting of 24 ministers from both groups, according to SPA.

The unnamed source also said that all plans necessary to implement the military and security components of the agreement have also been fulfilled, SPA reported.

Starting from Thursday, coalition military observers will supervise the separation of military forces in the city of Abyan and move them to the fronts, and others will be moved from the capital Aden to outside the governorate, the press agency reported.

Meanwhile, the Arab Coalition will continue to support security units for them to carry out their tasks of maintaining security, stability, and fighting terrorist organizations, according to the source.

The government that has been formed will be announced as soon as the military transfers are completed, the source added, according to SPA.

Saudi Arabia introduced the Riyadh Agreement in November 2019 to try to end the dispute in the country’s south that emerged in 2017.

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