.
.
.
.

Saudi Arabia signs $40 mln WFP agreement to prevent famine and malnutrition in Yemen

Published: Updated:

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) signed a $40 million agreement with the World Food program (WFP) to prevent famine and malnutrition in Yemen, according to a statement released by the center.

UN agencies reported last week that about 400,000 children under the age of five are in danger of dying of acute malnutrition in war-torn and impoverished Yemen.

For all the latest headlines follow our Google News channel online or via the app.

The signed agreement aims to improve food security for the most affected families in some areas of Yemen.

Yemen is engulfed in a bloody power struggle that erupted in 2014 between its internationally recognized government and Iran-backed Houthi militia, who control the capital Sanaa and most of the north.

“This agreement will benefit 2,333,333 individuals at a cost of USD 40,000,000 to prevent famine and malnutrition. The agreement aims to meet the priorities of food security and nutritional needs in accordance with the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification Report (IPC) for the food insecurity analysis in Yemen,” the statement added.

The center added that project will be completed within six months.

Dr. Abdullah Al Rabeeah, Supervisor General of KSrelief, stressed that Saudi Arabia has reached a pioneering role in global relief and humanitarian work.

“Throughout its history, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has extended the hand of support to brotherly and friendly countries based on its belief in the importance of humanitarian work,” Al Rabeeah added.

Al Rabeeah said that the Yemeni people’s humanitarian needs are a priority for Saudi Arabia, and that the Kingdom is the largest supporter and financier of humanitarian response plans for Yemen.

Read more:

US special envoy for Yemen heading back to region for second time in a month

Houthi offensive in Yemen’s Marib is battle against US, its allies: Official

Yemen prisoner swap negotiations end without a deal, both sides blame each other