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US foreign policy

US State Department approves $500 mln military deal with Saudi Arabia

“This proposed sale will support US foreign policy and national security objectives by helping to improve the security of a friendly country that continues to be an important force for political stability and economic growth in the Middle East,” the State Department said.

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The US State Department approved the sale of $500 million in equipment to Saudi Arabia, according to a statement released Thursday.

Despite the deal being a continuation of a prior agreement, the US package includes maintenance support services for helicopters, including Saudi Arabia’s Apache and Black Hawk helicopters, as well as a future fleet of CH-47D Chinook helicopters.

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“This proposed sale will support US foreign policy and national security objectives by helping to improve the security of a friendly country that continues to be an important force for political stability and economic growth in the Middle East,” the State Department said.

Washington said the deal would also help improve Saudi Arabia’s capability “to meet current and future threats.”

The deal will also aid in maintaining Saudi Arabia’s rotary-wing aircraft fleet, engines, avionics, weapons, and missile components, the State Department said. “Saudi Arabia will have no difficulty absorbing these articles and services into its armed forces.”

The deal has been sent to Congress for review and approval.

Thursday’s announcement comes after the Biden administration froze weapons sales to Saudi Arabia shortly after taking office.

President Joe Biden also halted US support to “offensive operations” in Yemen in support of Saudi Arabia while removing the Iran-backed Houthis from the terror blacklist.

Last week, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin was scheduled to visit Saudi Arabia and meet with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. The visit was rescheduled at the last minute due to a scheduling conflict.

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