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Farmers in Saudi Arabia’s AlUla grow Arabic Moringa crop to meet high demand

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Acres of the Arabic Moringa plant are being farmed in Saudi Arabia's AlUla where farm owners are being taught the mechanisms of growing what is considered the third largest crop in the region after dates and citrus.

Used for cosmetic, medical and soap products, the Moringa plant benefits both its growers and a rising demand in the consumer market, quickly making it a popular venture for many.

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As part of supporting the agriculture sector in AlUla, the Royal Commission established the Peregrina Center in 2019 to raise awareness among farmers on the importance of the crop and how to deal with it.

It also collects seeds from farmers, squeezes them, and ships Moringa oil to producers. Each farm has its own code to track and test the quality of its seeds.

“The residues of the seeds are preserved in a specialized way for use in other products,” said production coordinator at AlUla Peregrina Center, Raghad Albooshi.

Mishaal Sabah, an agricultural training supervisor, and Waleed al-Toailei, a farmer, show their products, in AlUla, Saudi Arabia, October 31, 2021. (Reuters)
Mishaal Sabah, an agricultural training supervisor, and Waleed al-Toailei, a farmer, show their products, in AlUla, Saudi Arabia, October 31, 2021. (Reuters)



Among the dwellers of AlUla's old town which is visited by locals and tourists alike, is Um Saud Alshathri, who until recently used to import her Moringa for its benefits.

“I am very happy to have these products of this quality. A product like Moringa is wanted in soaps and cosmetic products or as a medical product,” she said.

Read more: In this Saudi Arabian farm in al-Ahsa, rare hassawi rice is ‘as precious as gold’