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Mursi smiles for the camera in ‘prison mugshots’

The alleged mugshots are the first in which the former president has been seen wearing a prison suit

Published: Updated:

Deposed Egyptian President Mohammad Mursi was seen smiling for the cameras and wearing a prison suit in what was reported to be mugshots leaked to a local newspaper on Sunday.

Mursi is being tried on charges of inciting the killing of protesters in clashes outside the presidential palace in December 2012.

Following the first session of his trial at a makeshift court inside the Cairo Police Academy in the east of Cairo earlier this month, Mursi was transferred to Burj al-Arab prison in Alexandria.

The images of Mursi appearing allegedly inside the jail are the first in which the former president has been seen wearing the regular white prison suit.

During the first session of his trial, Mursi reportedly refused to dress in the prison uniform and appeared wearing a suit, smiling and telling the court that he was the country’s “legitimate president.”

He was also seen smiling in the prison mugshots, published in the al-Masry al-Youm independent daily on Sunday.

The newspaper’s English news website said the photos were taken as part of the prison authorities’ “standard procedure.”

“The photos taken by officials are part of standard procedure upon arrival at the prison and are attached to the subject’s police record.”

During the court session, the Islamist leader, who was the country’s first elected civilian president before he was removed in a military-backed uprising, made the Rabaa symbol with his hand, associated with the Islamist movement supporters. He asked the court to end the “travesty” that is his trial. He added that he was in the courtroom against his will.

“I see the judiciary as a cover for the treacherous coup,” the former president stated. “You have no right to try me because I am your president,” Mursi reportedly told the judge presiding the case.

His trial was adjourned to Jan. 8 due to chaos in the courtroom and his refusal to wear the white outfit mandatory for defendants.