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ISIS kills own fighters who tried to flee

Infighting erupted between ISIS fighters after one Tunisian and nine European militants tried to escape to Turkey

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At least nine members of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) have been killed in internal clashes within the group as 10 attempted to escape across the Turkish border to return to their homes, according to the London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR).

The clash apparently happened near the Syrian city of Al-Bab, north east of Aleppo on Saturday leaving five of the escapees and four of those trying to prevent them dead.

The group initially trying to flee were said to have included one Tunisian, the others were Arabian and foreign fighters.

But they were caught and detained by other ISIS fighters, according to SOHR.

Citing an unnamed source SOHR reported that the 10 members were able to convince a judge within ISIS who was “in charge in the [ISIS] prison” to “give them weapons and help with the escape.”

But as they tried to flee to the Turkish border the fire fight erupted leaving five escapees and four ISIS fighters dead.

The remaining five trying to escape were recaptured and detained.

SOHR said it is expected they will “face the same fate of more than 120 ISIS fighters who were executed in October, November, and December of 2014, after they tried to escape.”

The incident happened as Iraqi troops and militia advanced on the Iraqi city of Tikrit, which they were to later take from ISIS militants.

The news also comes just days after three British Muslim girls were said to have crossed the border into Syria to become ISIS brides.

But increasingly there are also reports coming out of Syria and Iraq of fighters attempting to flee the extremist militant group.

Lina Khatib, director of the Carnegie Middle East Centre in Beirut, told the news agency DNA that the “key challenge” being faced by ISIS was more “internal than external.”

She said that the group was failing to unite people of different origins under the caliphate.

Khatib said this had led to the group being “less effective in governing and less effective in military operations.”

There have also been a number of instances of former ISIS fighters who did manage to flee, who had become horrified by the poor living conditions, the aggressive behavior of other fighters and the beheadings carried out by ISIS executioners.