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Yemeni dialogue conference signs treaty on crisis

A Yemeni dialogue conference being held in Riyadh will sign an agreement on Tuesday, the third and last day of the meeting.

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A Yemeni dialogue conference being held in Riyadh signed an agreement on Tuesday, the third and last day of the meeting.

A spectrum of Yemeni political parties participating in the conference, excluding Houthis and former President Ali Abdullah Saleh – inked what has been termed as the “Riyadh Document.”

The conciliatory conference, sponsored by the GCC to bring together different factions in the crisis-hit country, had already set the first draft of the document on Monday.

The document included articles that urge the establishment of an army, demanding from international organizations to withhold any dealings with “coup leaders,” a reference to Houthi militias.

On the humanitarian level, the document stipulates that civilians who have been inflicted in the war will be compensated, especially in the city of Saada, which would be rebuilt to return to its state prior to the 2004 war.

The document also requests that refugee camps be built within Yemen to host all the displaced civilians. It pledges that fast solutions will be found to solve the problems of Yemenis stranded outside of their country.

The Riyadh Document requests creating new job opportunities for Yemenis inside countries of the GCC, as well as harboring support from the international community and the GCC to build a sustainable economy and create an infrastructure for investments in Yemen.

On a military front, Yemenis in Riyadh would pledge to support their national army, as protectors of the country. According to the document, the national army will incorporate the Popular Resistance within it.

Politically, the legitimate authorities in Yemen will ask the Security Council to uphold resolution 2216, which urges and end to financial and diplomatic dealings with Houthis.

Finally, the Riyadh Document pledged to discuss the draft of the constitution to encourage public debate and plan a referendum.

Regarding Yemen’s south, the document pledged to guarantee Yemenis the right to decide the political importance of the south within the framework of a united republic.

In order to “guarantee the implementation of the document,” the conference agreed to establish a national committee to supervise the enactment of the Riyadh Document.

The committee will include members who will represent Yemen’s diverse political and civilian parties in order to direct the political process in Yemen.