.
.
.
.

Israeli govt threatens to shut down human rights group

The government will demand that the group identifies the military personnel who gave anonymous testimonies of alleged crimes

Published: Updated:

Israel’s government is filing legal action against a local human rights group after it refused to reveal the identities of Israeli soldiers who alleged wrongdoing among the ranks during the 2014 Gaza War.

The government will demand next week in court that the group, Breaking the Silence, identifies the military personnel who gave anonymous testimonies of alleged crimes committed during the conflict, UK daily The Guardian reported on Wednesday.

The conflict, waged between Israeli forces and Hamas fighters, led to the deaths of over 2,000 people, many of them civilians.

The case comes after months of fierce debate on the human rights group by leading politicians and a public accusation of “treason” by the country’s defense minister.

The rights group’s legal team said that the move poses a threat to freedom of speech and human rights activism in Israel.

The group, which was founded 11 years ago, is made of partly of former Israeli army members, and has collected and published testimonies from soldiers that expose alleged human rights abuses.