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What will be the fate of the missing EgyptAir jet?

The black boxes of EgyptAir MS804 , which crashed on May 19, will stop emitting signals in just 4 days

Published: Updated:

The black boxes of EgyptAir, which crashed in the Mediterranean on May 19, will stop emitting signals in just 4 days, Egyptian investigators say.

Without the black boxes, which record critical flight data, investigators say there is not enough information to explain why Flight MS804 crashed into the Mediterranean on May 19, killing all 66 people on board.

The following question will be raised: as time runs out, what can the crash investigators do?

Hisham al-Halabi, a pilot, told the Arabic website of Al Arabiya News Channel that the two black boxes emit signals for around one month, and in case they are not found within that period, the emission of the signals will stop.

However, this does not mean that it would become impossible to find the boxes, although it will be more difficult, with the search process then needing specialized hi-tech devices.

Halabi adds that research apparatuses deployed all possible efforts in their operations, especially that there is an Egyptian submarine that can reach a depth of 3 km and a French submarine that can reach the depth of 2 km, both used in the operations. However, the crash area is open and is expanding on a daily basis due to sea currents and the scattering of victims’ body parts and belongings.

The search operations can reach a depth of 4 km in some areas.

He says that after the period of one month, when the boxes stop their emission of signals, the search will continue, and the two black boxes will be handled like the rest of the wreckage that cannot send signals. When found, they will be used as they contain the secrets and details of the last moments in the plane and can reveal the causes behind the crash.

He adds that the reason for the delay in finding the wreckage and victims’ body parts is because the area where the plane has crashed is an open space and it is expanding due to the flow of water currents. The operations were held under the supervision of the Egyptian navy, and with the participation of six countries: Greece, Cyprus, France, Italy, Britain and the US.