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Iran nuclear deal

Iran’s reasoning behind delay in nuclear deal talks ‘wearing very thin’: US envoy

The US and its partners in Europe and the Middle East had started to prepare for life without a nuclear deal with Iran, Malley said.

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Iran’s reasoning behind the halt in nuclear deal talks is “wearing very thin,” US Special Envoy for Iran Robert Malley said Monday.

Malley, speaking to reporters after a recent visit to Europe and the Middle East, said there was no “innocent explanation” as to why Iran was taking so long to resume talks in Vienna.

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“I think all of our interlocutors, whether they’re in the region, or in Europe, shared a deep and growing concern about the pace and direction” of Iran’s nuclear activities, Malley added.

The US and its partners in Europe and the Middle East have started to prepare for life without a nuclear deal with Iran, he said.

Stressing the desire to reach a deal through diplomacy, Malley said the US was looking at the possibility to “adapt to a world” where Iran was not in compliance with its nuclear commitments.

Asked about Iran Deputy Foreign Minister for Political Affairs Ali Bagheri Kani’s visit to Brussels, Malley said Iran could consult with whoever it wanted.

“He is free to consult; that’s not the issue. But of course, it can’t be a substitute for… direct talks with us because if Iran has any questions regarding sanctions relief and the commitment of the US, the best address to hear the answer would be from us,” Malley said.

Iran’s continued method of stalling while advancing its nuclear capabilities continued to raise questions about what they were doing.

Malley did, however, extend an olive branch to the Iranians, saying there was still time to revive the JCPOA.

“The path is open; it’s a path that is open now. It can’t be open forever because of the technical realities of Iran’s nuclear program, and we cannot wait forever if we are seeing Iran procrastinate on the one hand when it comes to diplomacy and accelerate when it relates to their nuclear program.”

- Developing