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Belgium urges EU intel sharing after Paris attacks

Belgian intelligence services have come under growing scrutiny following revelations that several of the attackers lived in Belgium

Published: Updated:

Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders called in an interview with AFP on Monday for intelligence sharing in Europe to be strengthened in the wake of the Paris attacks.

At least 129 people were killed in Friday’s gun and suicide attacks in the French capital, and Belgian intelligence services have come under growing scrutiny following revelations that several of the attackers lived in Belgium.

“We have to be able to trace these links wherever they are, whether it’s in France or Belgium or elsewhere in Europe,” Reynders said.

Reynders said he had been calling for more intelligence sharing in the EU and NATO “for several years”.

“I hope that after all these attacks, these dramas, there will be a change of mentality,” he said.

Defending Belgium’s record, he also said it was “impossible to live in a zero-risk situation when you see what is happening around the world.”

He said intelligence sharing would help shore up Europe’s passport-free Schengen area and push forward slow-moving plans to share 160,000 refugees around Europe.