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Clinton downplays chance of contested convention

Sanders, a US senator from Vermont, is trying to chip away at Clinton’s big lead in the number of delegates needed to secure the Democratic nomination

Published: Updated:

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton on Sunday dismissed the notion of a contested nominating convention and said she was not preparing for such a scenario, after her rival for her party’s presidential nomination racked up another victory.

Bernie Sanders won the Wyoming caucuses on Saturday, his seventh victory over Clinton in the last eight Democratic nominating contests as the two gear up for a crucial matchup on April 19 in New York state.

Sanders, a US senator from Vermont, is trying to chip away at Clinton’s big lead in the number of delegates needed to secure the Democratic nomination for the Nov. 8 presidential election.

He said on Sunday he believed he could close the gap, and left the door open for a so-called floor flight at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July if neither has won an outright majority of delegates.

In that case, a system of multiple ballots takes place, governed by complex rules, with candidates hoping to persuade delegates to vote for them.

Asked on CNN if she were preparing for such a scenario, Clinton said, “No, I intend to have the number of delegates that are required to be nominated.”

The former US secretary of state said she was leading Sanders by 2.5 million popular votes and in pledged delegates. “I feel good about the upcoming contests, and I expect to be the nominee,” she said.