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Coronavirus

Delta variant sparks surge in US hospitalizations of COVID-19 patients aged 30 to 39

Published: Updated:

The rate of COVID-19 hospitalizations for patients aged between 30 to 39 have hit a new record, data from the US government has shown, indicating that the superspreading delta variant is taking its toll on the unvaccinated, US-based news media the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported on Saturday.

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Before the delta COVID-19 variant, which was first identified in India, patients in this age bracket were less likely to end up in hospital after an infection.

Yet there has now been an increase in coronavirus patients in their 30s being admitted to hospitals which has become apparent in the country’s recent delta-driven virus surge. The WSJ reported that doctors and epidemiologists have attributed the rise in hospitalizations to their failure to get vaccinated.

As of Wednesday, the COVID-driven hospitalization rate for this age bracket reached about 2.5 per 100,000 people, according to the US’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of Health and Human Services, up from 2 in 100,000 people in January, indicating a significant upsurge.

“It means delta is really bad,” infectious disease physician and codirector of the Global Center for Health Security at US-based University of Nebraska Medical Center James Lawler told WSJ.

He said that the delta strain is much more transmissible, adding that various studies have shown that people infected with the variant can develop more a severe reaction to the virus compared to other strains.

The delta COVID-19 variant has gained greater ground in the US since early July, according to WSJ, resulting in a serious spike in new infections.

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