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More burqas being sold in Afghanistan after Taliban takeover

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An Afghan burqa seller said on Thursday that the sale of burqas has increased since the Taliban took over in Afghanistan.

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“In the previous government, I was wearing a hijab or other suitable clothes,” said Nadia, a customer at a store selling burqas. “Now I want to buy a burqa because after the arrival of the Taliban, they said that women should observe the veil,” she added.

The burqa covers the entire body, with a mesh fabric window to see through.

An Afghan girl stands among widows clad in burqas during a cash for work project by humanitarian organisation CARE International in Kabul, Afghanistan January 6, 2010. (Reuters)
An Afghan girl stands among widows clad in burqas during a cash for work project by humanitarian organisation CARE International in Kabul, Afghanistan January 6, 2010. (Reuters)



The Taliban, who captured Kabul and brought a chaotic end to 20 years of war, have tried to present a more moderate face to the world since they swept aside the US-backed government and returned to power last month, promising to protect human rights and refrain from reprisals against old enemies.

Afghanistan's Taliban rulers said on Wednesday they were planning to unveil their new government in “coming days” as the economy teetered on the edge of collapse more than two weeks after the extremist group captured Kabul and brought a chaotic end to 20 years of war.

“Horrifying” reports have emerged that the Taliban have severely restricted the rights of Afghan women and girls, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said when the extremists began taking over different regions of the country.

“I’m... deeply disturbed by early indications that that the Taliban are imposing severe restrictions on human rights in the areas under their control, particularly targeting women and journalists,” Guterres told reporters.

“It is particularly horrifying and heartbreaking to see reports of the hard won rights of Afghan girls and women being ripped away,” he added.

On Thursday, Women in the Herat province of Afghanistan staged protests, demanding basic rights for women and girls, including the right to work and get an education.

Meanwhile in Kabul, Afghan women's rights defenders and civil activists protested in front of the presidential palace to call on the Taliban for the preservation of their achievements and education.

Read more:

Afghan women protest in Herat calling for rights to work, get an education: Report

Taliban imposing ‘horrifying’ curbs on Afghan women’s rights: UN chief

Afghan female bank employees forced out of jobs as Taliban takes control