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Top US lawmakers condemn Sudan's military for use of violence

“The Sudanese people are losing faith and confidence in a now broken process that was designed to pave the way toward democracy, economic growth, and meaningful political reforms,” a statement from Gregory Meeks and Michael McCaul read.

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Top members of the US Congress condemned Sudan’s military on Thursday over the recent violence used on pro-democracy protesters.

“The Sudanese people are losing faith and confidence in a now broken process that was designed to pave the way toward democracy, economic growth, and meaningful political reforms,” a statement from Gregory Meeks and Michael McCaul read.

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Thursday’s comments come after increased use of force and violence was used reported against protests in Sudan demanding a transition to democracy.

“We strongly and unequivocally condemn the Sudanese military’s violent crackdown against pro-democracy protestors and other human rights violations. These actions further undermine the civilian-led transition in Sudan,” Meeks and McCaul said.

Earlier this week, it was reported that Sudan’s premier, Abdalla Hamdok, would announce his resignation. If he follows through, Hamdok would be stepping down just weeks after Sudan’s military overthrew his government.

Although he struck a deal with the top general, Abdel Fatah al-Burhan, Hamdok appears to be frustrated by a lack of support for his efforts to transition to a civilian-led government.

Protesters have also rejected the deal reached between the civilian-led government and the military.

“We will continue to apply pressure on Sudan’s leaders to follow through on their commitments, including by withholding US assistance and imposing targeted sanctions,” Meeks and McCaul said on Thursday.

They also noted that there was bipartisan support for the democratic aspirations of the Sudanese people.

Read more: UN calls for probe into rape allegations in Sudan protests

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