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US, EU sternly warn Sudan’s military against appointing PM unilaterally

Economic aid to Sudan hinges upon a government and transitional parliament, “which enjoy credibility with the Sudanese people and can lead the country to free and fair elections as a priority.”

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The US and Europe warned Sudan’s military on Tuesday against any attempts to appoint a new prime minister and cabinet without involving “civilian stakeholders.”

“The Troika and the European Union will not support a Prime Minister or government appointed without the involvement of a broad range of civilian stakeholders,” a statement from Norway, the United Kingdom, the United States and the European Union said.

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This was one of the strongest statements from Western powers since Abdalla Hamdok stepped down as Sudan’s prime minister over the weekend.

Despite signing a deal with the military, which arrested him and forced the collapse of his government, Hamdok said that he was “unable to combine all the components of the transition to reach a unified vision.”

In their statement Tuesday, the so-called Troika and the EU said Hamdok played a major role in leading Sudan’s democratic and economic reforms. “His resignation as Sudanese Prime Minister, two months after the military’s unconstitutional seizure of power, reinforces the urgent need for all Sudanese leaders to recommit to the country’s democratic transition and deliver on the Sudanese people’s demands for freedom, peace, and justice,” the statement said.

The statement also said the Western powers look forward to working with a government and a transitional parliament, “which enjoy credibility with the Sudanese people and can lead the country to free and fair elections as a priority.”

They added that this would necessary to facilitate any economic assistance to Sudan.

“In the absence of progress, we would look to accelerate efforts to hold those actors impeding the democratic process accountable,” they added, in a sign of potential sanctions.

Later Wednesday, US State Department Spokesman Ned Price said there was a need for Sudan to remain in a civilian-led transition, “not just a transition that includes civilians.”

Read more: Sudan PM’s decision to resign throws country further into the abyss

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