H.A. Hellyer
H.A. Hellyer

Dr H.A. Hellyer is Senior nonresident Fellow at the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council in DC, and Associate Fellow in International Security Studies at the Royal United Services Institute in London. Before joining the Council, he was appointed nonresident Fellow at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution in DC, and Research Associate at the John F Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. During his tenure at the University of Warwick (UK) as Fellow & then Senior Research Fellow, Dr Hellyer was appointed as Deputy Convenor of the UK Government's Taskforce for the 2005 London bombings, and served as the Foreign & Commonwealth Office's (FCO) first ESRC Fellow as part of the "Islam & Counter-Terrorism" teams with FCO security clearance, as a non-civil servant.

A British analyst, author and commentator on Arab affairs, Muslim-Western communities, Islamism, and European security policies, Dr Hellyer previously served as the first Arab world-based Senior Practice Consultant at the Gallup Organization, where he analyzed public opinion data in a variety of countries in the Arab world and the West. Some of his more recent publications include "Muslims of Europe: the Other Europeans" for Edinburgh University Press, "Engagement with the Muslim Community and Counter-Terrorism: British Lessons for the West" for the Brookings Institution Press, and "The Chance for Change in the Arab World: Egypt¹s Uprising" for Chatham House's Journal of International Affairs. His next book, which will be on the aftermath of the Egyptian revolutionary uprising of 2011, is due to be published in 2016.

The poignant symbolism of Mubarak’s release

In the past week, Egyptian former president Hosni Mubarak has been released from prison. Since the July 3 military overthrow of another former president, Mohammed Mursi, the obituaries for the January...

Egypt: binaries and traders in populism

This past week has changed the Egypt’s calculations. Egyptians still do not know how many people have died in the past week – and the count is rising. What’s more, it is likely to...

Egypt’s ‘day after’

Egypt does not get to talk about the ‘day after.’ Not yet, anyway. Whether it does sooner, rather than later, is a choice – and a scarce few seem interested in choosing the right...

Mursi is no father of the nation

Readers of this page will know that that under former president Mohammad Mursi’s rule, criticism of the opposition was generally absent, while calling the Muslim Brotherhood to account was more...

The ‘top secret’ Muslim Brotherhood

Over the past few weeks, since the ouster of former Egyptian president Mohammed Mursi, there has been something of a sea change in the identification of political actors and public figures. To begin...

Egypt: the police and the people are one hand…

Early on Friday night, I was walking along a peaceful road in southern Cairo, and came across a police checkpoint. A car slowed down, filled with people chanting ‘the army and the people are one...

How the June 30 uprising wasn’t the January 25 revolution

Was the June 30 uprising akin to the January 25 revolution, a continuation of it, or a failure of it? It was a good thing for Egypt, for a variety of reasons, that Mohammed Mursi prevailed over...

Breaking the cycle of vendetta in Egypt

As people watch the news on Egypt at present, it is hard to see anything more than a whirlwind, where cycles of change are spinning out of control, and without any real leadership to put a wrench in...