H.A. Hellyer
H.A. Hellyer

Dr H.A. Hellyer is Senior nonresident Fellow at the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council in DC, and Associate Fellow in International Security Studies at the Royal United Services Institute in London. Before joining the Council, he was appointed nonresident Fellow at the Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution in DC, and Research Associate at the John F Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. During his tenure at the University of Warwick (UK) as Fellow & then Senior Research Fellow, Dr Hellyer was appointed as Deputy Convenor of the UK Government's Taskforce for the 2005 London bombings, and served as the Foreign & Commonwealth Office's (FCO) first ESRC Fellow as part of the "Islam & Counter-Terrorism" teams with FCO security clearance, as a non-civil servant.

A British analyst, author and commentator on Arab affairs, Muslim-Western communities, Islamism, and European security policies, Dr Hellyer previously served as the first Arab world-based Senior Practice Consultant at the Gallup Organization, where he analyzed public opinion data in a variety of countries in the Arab world and the West. Some of his more recent publications include "Muslims of Europe: the Other Europeans" for Edinburgh University Press, "Engagement with the Muslim Community and Counter-Terrorism: British Lessons for the West" for the Brookings Institution Press, and "The Chance for Change in the Arab World: Egypt¹s Uprising" for Chatham House's Journal of International Affairs. His next book, which will be on the aftermath of the Egyptian revolutionary uprising of 2011, is due to be published in 2016.

Mursi is gone: What next?

The popularly legitimate coup took place in Egypt – and it is over. The country now needs to make sure that the conditions that led to it are not repeated – because, indeed, Egypt is far...

Mursi must call early elections, for his own sake

Since June 30, 2012, President Mohammad Mursi has had the chance to take Egypt forward, and avert chaos. Today, millions of Egyptians come out to tell him that he has failed, and that they want him to...

The quandary of June 30

Egypt has a way of putting otherwise rather reasonable people into rather unreasonable positions on a regular basis. The of June 30 protests are no exception. Increasingly, there are opponents of...

What’s behind Mursi’s Syria stance?

The Egyptian revolution of the 25th of January began … well, on the 25th of January, 2011. The Syrian revolution of the 15th of March began, well, on the 15th of March 2011. The revolutionaries...

Let’s be honest about Egypt’s NGO case

They are a testament to their nations – but their nation’s representatives, I am not so sure. Those who have been convicted in the recent NGOs trial in Egypt have reminded Egyptians,...

The Muslim Brotherhood as victims

It is a bit sad, but unsurprising. From the 1950s onwards, the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) were victims of some of the most sustained repression by the Egyptian state since the early 1950s. One would have...

Silent screams from Sinai

On August 5, 2012, 16 Egyptian military personnel were killed in Sinai, near Egypt’s border. There were calls from different quarters to demand accountability, with the main question being: if...

Why Egypt’s revolution continues

It has been more than two years since Egyptians went to Tahrir Square – and almost a year since they elected their first post-Mubarak president. The revolution, yet, that they called for is...