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WATCH: Refusing to be cowed, Somali opens country's first dairy

Published: Updated:

Starting a dairy in Mogadishu was not an obvious choice: Islamist bombs go off with startling regularity, electricity is patchy and expensive and most Somalis don't drink fresh cow's milk.

After 25 years in exile in the United Kingdom, Adbukadir Mohamed Sala has returned to Somalia where he is taking on the challenge of popularizing fresh cow's milk. The entrepreneur decided to brave the constant threat of terrorist attacks in Mogadishu to launch his factory.

The Irman Dairy factory pasteurizes and packs 2000 liters of milk per day. In Somalia, powdered cow's milk and camel's milk are preferred over fresh cow's milk, which is generally considered unhealthy. But Salad is ready to change his compatriots' eating habits.

The factory buys its milk from other companies in Mogadishu that raise cows like these, and produce their own yoghurts. For the herd's owner, business is going rather well.

Encouraging local production rather than imports, popularizing the consumption of fresh cow milk throughout the country, and promoting the local economy are clear objectives for these entrepreneurs. Irman Dairy has already anticipated the increase in demand for dairy products and would soon like to multiply its production by five.