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Brazilian Evangelicals launch ‘moral Facebook’

A group of Christians in Brazil have launched a social media network on which swearing or any perceivably unethical content is banned

Published: Updated:

The “like” button has been replaced with an “Amen” button for expressing appreciation for a post

A group of Christians in Brazil have launched a social media network on which swearing or any perceivably unethical content is banned.

The creators of Facegloria, who claim that the site has attracted 100,000 members in its first month, set up the site to serve those who find billionaire entrepreneur Mark Zuckerberg’s version lacking in moral values, reported the BBC.

Homosexual material is forbidden on the social media platform and currently 600 words are banned from use on the site. The “like” button has also been replaced with an “Amen” button for expressing appreciation for a post.

“On Facebook you see a lot of violence and pornography.

That’s why we thought of creating a network where we could talk about God, love and to spread His word,” one of the founders, web designer Atilla Barros, told AFP.

Brazil’s Facegloria is currently only available in Portuguese, however plans are in place for other language services and the development of a smartphone app.

It started three years ago when Barros and three other Christians working at the mayor’s office in Ferraz de Vasconcelos, near Brazil’s financial capital Sao Paulo, decided there was a market for a “moral” version of Facebook.

“We want to be morally and technically better than Facebook. We want all Brazilian Evangelicals to shift to Facegloria,” Barros told the Telegraph, which comes as no surprise with Brazil regarded as having the world’s largest Roman Catholic population, with 42 million of Brazil’s 202 million people estimated to be Evangelicals.

This is not the first “moral” social media platform. Ummaland is a social network for Muslims which launched in 2013 that currently has around 329,000 members.

Ummaland includes “extended privacy settings” for women as well as daily Islamic quotes.

“We are creating Ummaland on Islamic values, no small talk, no boasting, no gossiping and backbiting but focusing on the message that really matters,” co-founders Maruf Yusupov and Jamoliddin Daliyev told the BBC in a previously published interview.