King Salman hails strong Saudi, Egypt ties

The monarch described Saudi’s stance toward Egypt as 'unchangeable' as both countries have strategic links. (File photo: AP)

Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz expressed the kingdom’s close bond with Egypt in a phone call with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on Sunday.

Also Monday, Sisi contacted the leaders of Gulf Arab states to reassure them of strong Egyptian-Gulf ties after a leaked audio recording that purports to show him and senior aides being derisive of their rich Gulf donors, Reuters news agency reported.

Mekameleen, a pro-Islamist TV channel that aired the tape at the weekend, ran subtitles to identify the detailed conversations heard as being between Sisi and two of his senior staff on how to get Gulf states to funnel them more money. The authenticity of the tape could not be confirmed.

"The president [Sisi] affirmed .... the special relationship that the UAE has with the Egyptian people," the state news agency MENA reported, adding that Sisi also emphasized the "the strength of relations between the two countries".

King Salman described Saudi’s stance toward Egypt as “unchangeable” as both countries have strategic links and have a “shared future,” Al Arabiya News Channel reported.

The king added that relations between the two nations are too strong to be damaged.

Sisi meanwhile expressed his appreciation toward King Salman’s sentiments, according to Al Arabiya News Channel.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait provided Egypt with political and economic support after Sisi became president in June 2014.

After eight months in office, President Sisi continues struggling to stabilize a country rocked by violence and economic woes.

The former military strongman is fighting a war in the Sinai Peninsula against Islamist extremists. In other parts of the country, security forces battle to end regular bombings targeting security forces and public facilities.

The government blames much of the violence on the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, which have been ousted from the helm of power in June 2013.

But the Islamist group denies any links to violence and accuses the government and the security forces of responsibility of killing protesters and creating a situation of violence.

Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz expressed the kingdom’s close bond with Egypt in a phone call with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on Sunday.

Also Monday, Sisi contacted the leaders of Gulf Arab states to reassure them of strong Egyptian-Gulf ties after a leaked audio recording that purports to show him and senior aides being derisive of their rich Gulf donors, Reuters news agency reported.

Mekameleen, a pro-Islamist TV channel that aired the tape at the weekend, ran subtitles to identify the detailed conversations heard as being between Sisi and two of his senior staff on how to get Gulf states to funnel them more money. The authenticity of the tape could not be confirmed.

"The president [Sisi] affirmed .... the special relationship that the UAE has with the Egyptian people," the state news agency MENA reported, adding that Sisi also emphasized the "the strength of relations between the two countries".

King Salman described Saudi’s stance toward Egypt as “unchangeable” as both countries have strategic links and have a “shared future,” Al Arabiya News Channel reported.

The king added that relations between the two nations are too strong to be damaged.

Sisi meanwhile expressed his appreciation toward King Salman’s sentiments, according to Al Arabiya News Channel.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait provided Egypt with political and economic support after Sisi became president in June 2014.

After eight months in office, President Sisi continues struggling to stabilize a country rocked by violence and economic woes.

The former military strongman is fighting a war in the Sinai Peninsula against Islamist extremists. In other parts of the country, security forces battle to end regular bombings targeting security forces and public facilities.

The government blames much of the violence on the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, which have been ousted from the helm of power in June 2013.

But the Islamist group denies any links to violence and accuses the government and the security forces of responsibility of killing protesters and creating a situation of violence.

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:43 - GMT 06:43
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