Trump says Sudan will be removed from state sponsors of terrorism list

Wreaths are placed by the graves of sailors who died on the USS Cole at the Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, Oct. 12, 2005. (Reuters)

US President Donald Trump said Monday that an agreement was reached with Sudan and Khartoum would be lifted from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism after it paid $335 million to American victims of terrorism.

“GREAT news! New government of Sudan, which is making great progress, agreed to pay $335 MILLION to U.S. terror victims and families,” Trump tweeted.

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“Once deposited, I will lift Sudan from the State Sponsors of Terrorism list. At long last, JUSTICE for the American people and BIG step for Sudan!”

Sudanese PM Abdalla Hamdok thanked Trump and said his country was looking forward to the US president notifying Congress of the decision, “which has cost Sudan too much.”

“As we’re about to get rid of the heaviest legacy of Sudan’s previous, defunct regime, I should reiterate that we are peace-loving people and have never supported terrorism,” Hamdok said.

In May, the US Supreme Court dealt a legal setback to Sudan, ruling that the African nation could not avoid punitive damages in lawsuits accusing it of complicity in the 1998 al-Qaeda bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people.

Twelve Americans were killed by the Aug. 7, 1998, truck bombs that detonated outside the embassies in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The lawsuits involve 567 people, mostly non-US citizens who were employees of the US government and their relatives.

On October 12, 2000, USS Cole came to the harbor of Aden, Yemen, for a routine fuel stop. A small craft approached the port side of the destroyer, and an explosion occurred, killing 17 and injuring 39 and putting a 40-by-40 foot gash in the port side of the ship.

The attack was claimed by al-Qaeda, in an early success for the terror group and its founder Osama bin Laden.

A US court then ruled that Sudan, where the two bombers were trained, was responsible for the attack – a claim Khartoum always denied.

Gloria Clodfelter mourns her son during a memorial service on the fifth anniversary of the bombing of the USS Cole at Arlington National Cemetery in, Virginia, Oct. 12, 2005. (Reuters)

Gloria Clodfelter mourns her son during a memorial service on the fifth anniversary of the bombing of the USS Cole at Arlington National Cemetery in, Virginia, Oct. 12, 2005. (Reuters)

In 1993, Washington listed Sudan in its terrorism blacklist for its alleged support of extremist groups. Bin Laden used to reside in Sudan from 1992 to 1996.

Read more:

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- With Agencies

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Last Update: Monday, 19 October 2020 KSA 21:46 - GMT 18:46
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