Trump’s Supreme Court pick cements conservative legacy regardless of election result

US President Donald Trump watches Judge Amy Coney Barrett deliver remarks as he holds an event to announce her as his nominee to fill the Supreme Court seat, Sept. 26, 2020. (Reuters)

US President Donald Trump Monday cemented his mark for years to come after his third Supreme Court nominee was approved, in a landmark move praised by Republicans as Democrats lamented Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation.

The US presidential elections will take place on Nov. 3, but President Donald Trump will have at least one thing to celebrate regardless of the outcome - his mark on the Supreme Court.

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On Monday, Barrett became Associate Justice of the Supreme Court after Republicans and Democrats ripped into each other on the Senate floor. The vote stood at 52-48 in favor of Barrett.

Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called Monday’s confirmation “one of the darkest days in the 231-year history of the US Senate.”

He alleged that Americans would “suffer the consequences for a generation” and said that any justifications by Republicans were “rubbish.”

Republican Senators, meanwhile, hailed Barrett’s judicial record and qualifications.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Democrats were upset because they wanted “activist judges” to work on policy-making, rather than judicial matters.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks before the US Senate votes on the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Oct. 26, 2020. (Reuters)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks before the US Senate votes on the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Oct. 26, 2020. (Reuters)

“The louder they scream, the more inaccurate they are,” McConnell said, referring to Democrats.

“You can’t win em all. Elections have consequences,” he said, explaining that Republicans were “exercising” the power given to them by the people.

Barrett gives the Supreme Court a 6-3 push in favor of conservatives. The nine-member bench was considered 5-4 in favor of conservatives prior to the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month.

Barrett’s confirmation process took place at unprecedented speed as the Senate Judiciary Committee began hearings on Sept. 12, less than a month after Ginsburg passed away.

Despite the heavy criticism and grilling from Democrats, Barrett garnered the Republican-led Senate’s support over the weekend. Democratic Senators boycotted the session.

She will become Trump’s third straight nominee in the country’s highest court. Supreme Court justices remain on the bench for life.

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at University of Buffalo School of Law in Buffalo, New York. (File photo: Reuters)

US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks at University of Buffalo School of Law in Buffalo, New York. (File photo: Reuters)

Trump tapped Neil Gorsuch in 2017 and Brett Kavanaugh in 2018 as his first two picks.

Democrats called for Trump and the Republican-led Senate to wait until after the Nov. 3 elections to fill the vacant seat. During former President Barack Obama’s last year in office, his pick to replace the late Antonin Scalia was turned down by the Senate.

McConnell spearheaded the efforts to deny Obama’s nominee from making any progress.

Following the death of Ginsburg, a liberal judge respected by all sides, including Trump, McConnell said the circumstances were different this time around. He said that during Obama’s term, the Senate and White House were ruled by opposite parties.

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Last Update: Tuesday, 27 October 2020 KSA 03:15 - GMT 00:15
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