If it feels right – do it! How to use intuition

Have you lost something and then thought ‘it is there’ (in an unexpected place) and so looked and found it? (Shutterstock)

Have you ever felt ‘something is not right’ - and, forewarned, avoided a problem?

Have you lost something and then thought ‘it is there’ (in an unexpected place) and so looked and found it?

Usually we recognize our intuition only when an especially important message is received such as not feeling ‘good’ about a person or situation, or we get an impulse to take a particular action.

Any intuition-dominant thinker who’s struggled with maths problems or logic-dominant thinker who’s struggled with small-talk knows how difficult and hopeless the experience feels like. Because the reality you cannot be expert at both.

How does Intuition work?

The left side of the brain processes information in a linear manner. It processes from part to whole. It takes pieces, lines them up, and arranges them in a logical order; then it draws conclusions.

The right brain however, processes from whole to parts, holistically. It starts with the answer. It sees the big picture first, not the details. If you are right-brained, you may have difficulty following a lecture or understanding an email unless you are given the big picture first.

Intuition also works on the right brain too assessing information from ‘the big picture’. We tend to process information using our dominant side. However, the learning and thinking process is enhanced when both side of the brain participate in a balanced manner.

This means strengthening your less dominate hemisphere of the brain. Some people are gifted by having a natural ability to ‘see things’ or ‘hear messages’. Intuition also works by using our nervous-muscular system and by manipulating our normal five senses - seeing, hearing, feeling, smelling, and tasting.

East vs West

The analytic or logical approach is culturally more valued in Western contexts, whereas the holistic approach is more valued in East Asian contexts, this leads to conflict about what is normal or desirable when working out an approach where the team is international.

Sometimes we need to make fairly accurate predictions and decisions without complete information. This skill enables us to navigate the world without having a deep understanding of it. As a result, intuition trains us to experience the feeling that we understand something without examining every detail.

However, when learning a technical concept, every detail matters. If you are a logic-dominant you should be good at this. But if you are intuition dominant thinker then the premature feeling of understanding stops you from examining all the details.

How to recognize

To recognize the kind of feeling that indicates true guidance, look for three qualities: calmness, clarity, and joy. Intuition is always based in a deep sense of calmness and detachment. The second thing to associate with true intuition is a sense of clarity. The clarity of colors and images are strong signs that you’ve tuned in to true intuition.

Finally, look for a sense of inner joy. In developing your ability to recognize intuition, it’s important to test your guidance over a period of time. Unless you have no choice, don’t make big decisions on the strength of intuition.

It’s better to begin with small decisions, and continually test your ability. If you’re doing the right thing, your inner feeling will gradually come stronger and clearer as you act, It takes time and effort to train gut feelings. They don't come from nowhere.

Any intuition-dominant thinker who’s struggled with math problems or logic-dominant thinker who’s struggled with small-talk knows how difficult and hopeless the experience feels like. Because the reality you cannot be expert at both. The more you practice one the worse you get at the other.

As Winston Churchill said: “All people are offered help by their Intuition, but most pick themselves up and escape as fast as possible!”

SHOW MORE
Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:49 - GMT 06:49
Top