UK coronavirus death toll rises by 674 to 26,771

A man wears a protective face mask as he stands in front of a closed souvenir booth in Westminster in London, as the country is in lockdown to help curb the spread of coronavirus on April 21, 2020. (AP)

A total of 26,771 people have died of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, up by 674 in a 24-hour period, data from the health ministry showed on Thursday.

The country has 171,253 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, up by 6,032 since the previous day.

The death figures are as of 5 p.m. (1600 GMT) on April 29, while the data on confirmed cases are as of 9 a.m. (0800 GMT) on April 30.

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson waves as he leaves Downing Street, as the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues. London, Britain, March 25, 2020. (Reuters)

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson waves as he leaves Downing Street, as the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues. London, Britain, March 25, 2020. (Reuters)

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Thursday Britain was now past the peak of its coronavirus outbreak and promised to set out a plan next week on how the country might start gradually returning to normal life.

In his first news conference since recovering from a serious case of COVID-19, Johnson sought to offer hope to weary Britons, but urged them to stick with lockdown restrictions that are hammering livelihoods and the economy.

“I can confirm today that for the first time, we are past the peak of this disease. We’re past the peak and we’re on the downward slope, and we have so many reasons to be hopeful for the long term,” Johnson said.

Britain has the second-highest official COVID-19 death toll in Europe with 26,771 deaths.

That has put pressure on the government over its initial response to the outbreak - which lagged some European peers - and informs its cautious approach towards lifting restrictions in case that leads to a second spike of infections.

Defending his handling of the outbreak, Johnson said the death toll could have been a lot worse.

 A woman wears a protective mask to protect from coronavirus, in Westminster as the country continues its lockdown in an attempt to control the spread of the coronavirus, in London on April 18, 2020. (AP)

A woman wears a protective mask to protect from coronavirus, in Westminster as the country continues its lockdown in an attempt to control the spread of the coronavirus, in London on April 18, 2020. (AP)

“It’s thanks to that massive collective effort to shield the NHS (National Health Service) that we avoided an uncontrollable and catastrophic epidemic, where the reasonable worst case scenario was 500,000 deaths,” he said.

“It is vital that we do not now lose control and run slap into a second, an even bigger mountain.”

Under pressure to outline an exit strategy from the lockdown, Johnson promised to set out next week a “menu of options” on how restrictions could be eased, but said the exact dates of any change would be driven by scientific advice.

He said face coverings may play a part in the next phase, departing from the government’s line up until now, which was that there was insufficient evidence to call on the general public to start using them.

“As part of coming out of the lockdown, I do think that face coverings will be useful both for epidemiological reasons, but also for giving people confidence that they can go back to work,” said Johnson. “You’re going to be hearing more about that, and that kind of thing, next week.”

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 10:06 - GMT 07:06
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