In power for 15 years, Iraq’s Shiites split ahead of crucial vote

The divisions within the community now risk splitting the Shiite vote in a May 12 election. (Reuters)

United in their fight against Saddam Hussein’s oppression for decades, Iraq’s Shiites have become deeply fragmented and disillusioned with their leaders after 15 years in power.

In Iraq’s Shiite heartlands, many who once voted blindly along sectarian lines are now turning their ire against the Shiite-led governments they say have failed to repair crumbling infrastructure, provide jobs or end the violence.

The divisions within the community now risk splitting the Shiite vote in a May 12 election, which could complicate and delay the formation of a government, threaten gains against ISIS and let Iran meddle further in Iraq’s politics.

In the oil-rich southern province of Basra, 81-year-old retired teacher Mowafaq Abdul Ghani is disappointed with the performance of the Shiite leaders since Saddam fell in 2003.

Saddam’s fall

“I’ve been waiting for Saddam to fall since the 1970s. I’ve been waiting for you! Why would you do this to us?” he said.

“Look around. The streets are filthy, there are flies everywhere, pot holes at every step. Twenty years ago Basra was terrible but it was better than this,” Abdul Ghani said.

In the holy city of Najaf, home to Imam Ali’s shrine and Iraq’s most revered Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, there was a similar feeling of disillusionment.

A man holds a sheep for sale next to campaign posters of candidates ahead of parliamentary election, in Iraq, April 20, 2018. (Reuters)

A man holds a sheep for sale next to campaign posters of candidates ahead of parliamentary election, in Iraq, April 20, 2018. (Reuters)

At midnight on April 13 when official campaigning began, hordes of party activists plastered campaign posters on every visible surface, in same cases covering pictures honoring those who died fighting ISIS.

“They took down the martyrs and replaced them with thieves,” said unemployed 29-year-old Abbas Saad.

Even Sistani seems unhappy with the performance of the politicians, issuing a fatwa recently implicitly calling on Shiites to vote for new blood.

“The tried should not be tried,” said the fatwa from Sistani, whose decrees are sacrosanct to millions.

New generation

Under the informal power-sharing arrangement in place since Saddam’s fall, the prime minister has always come from the Shiite majority with a Kurdish president and a Sunni speaker.

In the past, while no party has won enough seats to govern alone, there has typically been one Shiite leader with enough support to shape a ruling coalition government.

This time there are three Shiite frontrunners: incumbent Haider al-Abadi who has promoted a more inclusive government, his overtly sectarian predecessor Nuri al-Maliki who failed to inspire unity and Hadi al-Amiri, a military commander close to Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guards seen as a war hero by many.

A woman walks past campaign posters of candidates ahead of parliamentary election, in Baghdad, Iraq April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily

A woman walks past campaign posters of candidates ahead of parliamentary election, in Baghdad, Iraq April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily

If no clear winner emerges, Iran could have more of a chance to act as a broker between the Shiite parties and influence who becomes prime minister, while ISIS could capitalize on any power vacuum and exploit Sunni feelings of marginalization.

At a party for university graduates in Najaf, dozens of young people danced under a glittering disco ball and listened to poetry in a packed hall. At the event sponsored by Adnan al-Zurfi, a former governor running on Abadi’s Victory Alliance list, the talk was of inclusiveness.

About 60 percent of Iraqis are 27 or younger and many young people in urban areas say they want a secular government, underscoring the split within the Shi’ite voter base.

“I’m against voting based on sect,” said student Ali Reda.
Abadi’s list, touted by Zurfi as “cross-sectarian”, is the only one contesting the election in all of Iraq’s 18 provinces.

“The youth care about unemployment, education, and freedoms,” he said at a nearby cafe surrounded by young men playing billiards. “The Shiite majority has a responsibility to calm the fears of other communities. We are proposing an inclusive government in which everyone is represented.”

Shiite rule

Just an hour away from Najaf in Karbala, the holy city visited by 30 million Shiite pilgrims a year, sharing power with Sunnis and Kurds is not seen as a solution.

“Iraq has a Shiite majority. It is natural that it be ruled by a Shiite,” said Muntazer al-Shahrestani, who runs a school for Shiite clerics.
While there has been no census for a long time, US figures from 2003 put the breakdown of the Iraqi population at roughly 48-60 percent Shiite Arabs, 15-22 percent Sunni Arabs, 18 percent Kurds with other groups making up the rest.

Shahrestani said while the rights of minorities should be protected there should be a Shiite government, echoing a popular opinion among religious Shiites.

Many campaign on that sentiment, none more than former prime minister Maliki, who is widely viewed by Sunni and Kurds as sectarian and oppressive.

Maliki is also blamed by many Shiites for losing a third of Iraq to ISIS in 2014 before being replaced by Abadi, but he remains popular with others who credit him with signing Saddam’s death warrant.

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:56 - GMT 06:56
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