Ready to get a lil messy? ‘Egyptian Kahk’ is your best way to celebrate Eid

On the occasion of Eid al-Fitr, the nation embarks on festivities by devouring “Kahk el-Eid”. (Courtesy: Nola Cupcakes)

Even as Ramadan comes to an end, the Egyptian dessert fiesta is yet to be over!

On the occasion of Eid al-Fitr, the nation embarks on festivities by devouring “Kahk el-Eid”.

During the last ten days of Ramadan, odors of baking Kahk -- sugary Eid cookies -- start coming out of homes, bakeries and sweet shops across streets, spreading happy vibes to all Egyptians.

“Kahk” decorates Egyptian dining tables to mark the end of the Muslim fasting month. After performing Eid prayers early in the morning, Egyptians come back home to take a sip of tea with those delicious cookies.

Older generations are used to the scenes of mothers and grandmothers surrounded by their children to delicately decorate each biscuit before putting it in large trays to enter the oven.

The cookies are usually filled with "Agameya" (special honey filling), walnuts, pistachios, or left plain to be coated with powdered sugar.

While many Egyptians still carry on with the tradition of home-made Eid cookies, various shops today offer a wide range of delicious Kahk.

It is worth mentioning that Eid al-Fitr is referred to at times as “Eid al-Kahk,” as the other Islamic Eid (Eid al-Adha) is marked with slaughtering meat, to honor Prophet Ibrahim’s sacrifice of his son Ismail.

But just like adding various twists and tweaks to traditional desserts in Ramadan, some bakeries decided to introduce new Kahk fillings, by adding Hazelnut chocolate paste Nutella and Red velvets.

 

 

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:49 - GMT 06:49
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