‘No excuse for flabby arms;’ new fitness video targets covered Muslim women

Wearing loose clothes or an Abaya is no excuse for not losing weight with Nadoona fitness. (Photo Courtesy: Facebook)

Are you tired of your fitness instructor flashing their perfect abs and legs while you struggle to keep up with the beat?

Then, it seems, the new Nadoona Extreme workout video, aimed towards covered Muslim women, is for you.

Nadine Abu Jubara from Orlando, Florida, and fitness instructor Zainab Ismail will launch the first fitness video for Muslim women in DVD format in the U.S. next month.

Wearing an Abaya, or any loose fitting modest clothing, is no excuse for gaining weight, according to the two the Muslim fitness instructors who kick started the idea of a workout video specifically for Muslim women.

“The Nadoona woman doesn’t need to show skin as a reason to have toned arms and a formidable six pack,” reads the official website.

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“Modesty is no excuse to neglect the body and long sleeves and flowing tops shouldn’t mean flabby arms and love handles,” they say on their website.

“From an Islamic standpoint we have rules on what you can and can't see,” added Abu Jubara in an interview with the Telegraph.
“Having a woman in booty shorts and a bra? I don't know that's something you want [your husband and children] to see.”

In a trailer for the video, Zainab, a Puerto Rican-American born in New York who converted to Islam four years ago, demonstrates moves including lunges and push-ups while wearing a colorful hijab and flowing training clothes.

Each step in the workout starts with a brief prayer, reinforcing the religious-spiritual aspect of the concept.

Nadine, a Muslim and of Palestinian-Arab descent, says she got into fitness after losing more than 25 kilograms several years ago.

“It was after my 65 pound (29.4 kg) weight loss journey, I realized that there were no resources in the Muslim community for sound health and fitness,” she said in an interview with the Telegraph.

The fitness DVD market is worth $264 million in the U.S. alone, according to the Telegraph. An industry report by IBIS, a leading international publisher of business intelligence, predicted in 2012 that the industry would grow 9.8 per cent during the next five years.

Are you tired of your fitness instructor flashing their perfect abs and legs while you struggle to keep up with the beat?

Then, it seems, the new Nadoona Extreme workout video, aimed towards covered Muslim women, is for you. Nadine Abu Jubara from Orlando, Florida, and fitness instructor Zainab Ismail will launch the first fitness video for Muslim women in DVD format in the U.S. next month.

Wearing an Abaya, or any loose fitting modest clothing, is no excuse for gaining weight, according to the two the Muslim fitness instructors who kick started the idea of a workout video specifically for Muslim women.

“The Nadoona woman doesn’t need to show skin as a reason to have toned arms and a formidable six pack,” reads the official website.

“Modesty is no excuse to neglect the body and long sleeves and flowing tops shouldn’t mean flabby arms and love handles,” they say on their website.

“From an Islamic standpoint we have rules on what you can and can't see,” added Abu Jubara in an interview with the Telegraph.
“Having a woman in booty shorts and a bra? I don't know that's something you want [your husband and children] to see.”

In a trailer for the video, Zainab, a Puerto Rican-American born in New York who converted to Islam four years ago, demonstrates moves including lunges and push-ups while wearing a colorful hijab and flowing training clothes.

Each step in the workout starts with a brief prayer, reinforcing the religious-spiritual aspect of the concept.

Nadine, a Muslim and of Palestinian-Arab descent, says she got into fitness after losing more than 25 kilograms several years ago.

“It was after my 65 pound (29.4 kg) weight loss journey, I realized that there were no resources in the Muslim community for sound health and fitness,” she said in an interview with the Telegraph.

The fitness DVD market is worth $264 million in the U.S. alone, according to the Telegraph. An industry report by IBIS, a leading international publisher of business intelligence, predicted in 2012 that the industry would grow 9.8 per cent during the next five years.

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:41 - GMT 06:41
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