Sweden high-tech office block implants staff with microchips

Reading University professor Kevin Warwick is believed to be the first person to have a microchip implanted in his body. (Shutterstock)

Sweden is offering glimpses of the possible future of the workplace, and it’s all about human-computer interaction. A group of workers at a Stockholm high-tech office can now open security doors and operate photocopiers at work with a wave of the hand, all thanks to microchips implanted in their bodies, according to a Times article published Saturday.

The radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips may eventually be implanted in as many as 700 employees at the Epicenter block in Stockholm, the newspaper reported.

As many as 700 employees at the Epicenter block in Stockholm may eventually have the radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips implanted into the backs of their hands.

The chips are about the size of a grain of rice and are implanted in the back of the hand. They store personalized security information that is transmitted over short distances to special receivers.

The technology isn’t new and more than 10 million in Britain use it on a daily basis though the Oyster card, a contactless card containing an RFID chip used for accessing London’s public transport system.

“We already interact with technology all the time,” Hannes Sjoblad, the chief disruption officer at the Swedish bio-hacking group BioNyfiken responsible for implanting the chips into workers, told the daily.

“Today it’s a bit messy — we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn’t it be easy to just touch with your hand? That’s really intuitive. We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped — the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip,” he said.

“I believe we have just started discovering the things we can do with this. There is huge potential for life- logging,” he said.

“Imagine sensors around a gym that recognizes, for instance, who is holding a dumbbell via the tag in your hand. There is an ongoing explosion in the Internet of things. The sensors will be all around for me to be able to register my activity in relation to them.”

Reading University professor Kevin Warwick is believed to be the first person to have a microchip implanted in his body.

U.S. tech firm MC10 is developing the “BioStamp,” a wearable monitor that is imprinted on the skin and resembles a temporary tattoo.
 

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:43 - GMT 06:43
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