Subway bread isn’t bread due to sugar levels, says Ireland’s Supreme Court

Liverpool FC Striker Daniel Sturridge prepares a sandwich for a fan at a Subway Restaurant on Friday, July 25, 2014 in Boston. (File Photo: AP)

Ireland’s Supreme Court has ruled that bread sold by the fast food chain Subway contains so much sugar that it cannot be legally defined as bread.

The ruling came in a tax dispute brought by Bookfinders Ltd., an Irish Subway franchisee, which argued that some of its takeaway products - including teas, coffees and heated sandwiches - were not liable for value-added tax.

A panel of judges rejected the appeal Tuesday, ruling that the bread sold by Subway contains too much sugar to be categorized as a “staple food,” which is not taxed.

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“There is no dispute that the bread supplied by Subway in its heated sandwiches has a sugar content of 10 percent of the weight of the flour included in the dough, and thus exceeds the 2 percent specified,” the judgement read.

The law makes a distinction between “bread as a staple food” and other baked goods “which are, or approach, confectionery or fancy baked goods,” the judgement said.

Bookfinders was appealing a 2006 decision by authorities who refused to refund value-added tax payments. Lower courts had dismissed the case before it reached the Supreme Court.

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Last Update: Thursday, 01 October 2020 KSA 18:49 - GMT 15:49
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