Who's tampering with the people of Tripoli?

You'd expect many Lebanese citizens to now feel more reassured about their future after confusing and crooked policies regarding the roles of the state, resistance and citizens, were finalized by the government.

The politicians are on one side, while the people are on another sides called Tripoli, Aarsal, Labweh, with booby-trapped cars, surging terrorism and deteriorating economic conditions.

If the cabinet does not want to resemble its incapable predecessor, then it must take such measures. Otherwise, all we have is the same cabinet as Miqati's but with new faces.

Nayla Tueni

Tripoli has witnessed a continued round of clashes with unknown aims. Aims are not important for the average person. They might become martyrs despite their will, killed by sniper's shot on their way to work perhaps. Their only fault is that they belong to a certain sect or live in a specific area.

The state's responsibility

The security situation in Tripoli brings up the question about the state's responsibility. Unlike Aarsal and other cities, Tripoli is not a city on the border that is prone to foreign intervention and it's not outside the state's authority, like Baalbeck and Hermel are. Tripoli has always been Lebanon's second capital.

Therefore it's important to raise an eyebrow at the state's incapabilities. There are suspicions of a state conspiracy weaved in the ongoing struggle in Tripoli. If true, such a conspiracy is tied either to making political gains or to a regional situation, Syria's crisis in particular. The city has therefore transformed into a mailbox for exchange messages and threats.

But there's a truth that must be spoken, or rather, several truths. The fighters in Tripoli receive arms and funds from several parties which the security forces know well. Arms are being delivered via legitimate routes and Lebanese security forces can obstruct the supply of this aid or expose funders and those supplying arms. However, there's a political decision to keep the situation as it is.

Najib Miqati's government, which included ministers from Tripoli, failed to take any decisive measures in the city. The current government, which also includes ministers from Tripoli, must initiate exceptional measures that help restore the state's prestige in the north and arrest fighters and those tampering with security, regardless of which party they belong to.

If the cabinet does not want to resemble its incapable predecessor, then it must take such measures. Otherwise, all we have is the same cabinet as Miqati's - but with new faces.

This article was first published in al-Nahar on March 17, 2014.

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Nayla Tueni is one of the few elected female politicians in Lebanon and of the two youngest. She became a member of parliament in 2009 and following the assassination of her father, Gebran, she is currently a member of the board and Deputy General Manager of Lebanon’s leading daily, Annahar. Prior to her political career, Nayla had trained, written in and managed various sections of Annahar, where she currently has a regular column. She can be followed on Twitter @NaylaTueni.
 

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:41 - GMT 06:41
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