Lebanon’s army is above sycophants, political climbers

Recent days have witnessed a social media campaign concerning Lebanon’s army. At the very least, the campaign is silly and underestimates what the army and country are confronting. We reject turning the army into a promotional commodity that restaurants and hotels run ads for, thus exploiting the institution and the glory surrounding it.

However, we also reject sycophants and political climbers exploiting Army Day - which was on Aug. 1 - to hog the limelight and criticize the military, an institution that is the most steadfast and protective over what is left of the state structure.

Challenges

The army is facing the most complicated challenge in its history - not a foreign army against which it can win or lose a battle, but terrorism that has targeted the Arab world and the West. The army faces this challenge amid the presence of more than 2 million Syrian and Palestinian refugees, among whom fighters and agents with different affiliations hide.

The army is facing the most complicated challenge in its history - not a foreign army against which it can win or lose a battle, but terrorism that has targeted the Arab world and the West.

Nayla Tueni

The latter pose a security threat, as they are tantamount to a ticking time bomb. The army is working hard to control the situation in Palestinian camps, which for a while now have obstructed the state’s capabilities regarding security.

Army members are sacrificing their lives on security missions that are not part of its assigned role. It has found itself at the heart of these developments because other institutions have failed to perform their duties.

This is our army, and it does not matter if someone produces a silly video clip to glorify it. The army command has said all these ads celebrating Army Day have been produced by individuals, companies or organizations, and have nothing to do with the military.

Maintaining its unity, discipline and performance comes before all other calculations of individuals, parties and movements. Harming its stability is a crime, and those who do so must be held accountable.

This article was first published in an-Nahar on Aug. 1, 2016.

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Nayla Tueni is one of the few elected female politicians in Lebanon and of the two youngest. She became a member of parliament in 2009 and following the assassination of her father, Gebran, she is currently a member of the board and Deputy General Manager of Lebanon’s leading daily, Annahar. Prior to her political career, Nayla had trained, written in and managed various sections of Annahar, where she currently has a regular column. She can be followed on Twitter @NaylaTueni

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 13:58 - GMT 10:58
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