What is the purpose of dialogue in Lebanon?

What is the point of the dialogue that has been ongoing for more than a year now between the Future Movement and Hezbollah, or the point of the expanded national dialogue sessions? What is the point of all that amid the presence of the Resistance Brigades – a militant group affiliated with Hezbollah – which consists of some 50,000 members, almost the same number as Lebanese army personnel?

We will not say more than what Interior Minister Nohad al-Machnouq said when he described the Resistance Brigades as the brigades of strife and occupation. What is the purpose of organizing, arming and deploying its members across Lebanon? Is there legitimacy or legality to the Resistance Brigades?

Let us assume that resistance against Israel called for legislating resistance within consecutive governments. What about the Resistance Brigades, which is being used to impose well-known sectarian and partisan orientations on others for the purpose of taming them and completely controlling Lebanon by intimidation and the power of arms? People are asking where the state, army, security institutions and ministries are amid all this.

It is a shock that dialogue between Hezbollah and the Future Movement is ongoing without knowing what it has achieved or what it will achieve, while the Resistance Brigades is expanding

Nayla Tueni

Delayed response

Why do they only speak out or take a stance after it is too late? Where was everyone following the devastating events of May 7, 2008? What have they done to address the dangerous consequences, and the fact that arms used to resist Israel were used locally to incite sectarian strife? These events have led to sectarian divisions from which Lebanon still suffers today.

If the deployment of these brigades in the reported magnitude is true, this is a shock to everyone. However, more shocking is that dialogue between Hezbollah and the Future Movement is ongoing without knowing what it has achieved or what it will achieve, while the Resistance Brigades is expanding.

This article was first published in an-Nahar on Aug. 22, 2016.
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Nayla Tueni is one of the few elected female politicians in Lebanon and of the two youngest. She became a member of parliament in 2009 and following the assassination of her father, Gebran, she is currently a member of the board and Deputy General Manager of Lebanon’s leading daily, Annahar. Prior to her political career, Nayla had trained, written in and managed various sections of Annahar, where she currently has a regular column. She can be followed on Twitter @NaylaTueni
 

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:49 - GMT 06:49
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