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Father of Saudi student murdered in UK: ‘Justice was not served’

Nahid Al-Manea was attacked on the morning of June 17, 2014, as she walked toward the University of Essex

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The father of Nahid Al-Manea, the Saudi student killed in Britain in 2014, said he was not satisfied with the British investigation into his daughter’s murder and that he was not contacted directly to be notified of the murderer’s confession.

Ibrahim Al-Zaid, the victim’s uncle, said the victim’s father found out about the conviction of his daughter’s murderer through social media on Friday.

“Her father read in British newspapers on Friday that a 17-year-old British teenager with a mental illness has plead guilty to the murder of Al-Manea in June 2014 in Essex city. He also admitted killing British national James Attfield, 33, three months earlier,” said Al-Zaid.

University of Essex
University of Essex

He added that the murderer was not identified for legal reasons and has previously denied the allegations.

“My niece was a University of Essex student. She had been studying on the English Language Program at the International Academy in the university since January 2014. She was expected to complete the program in August 2014 and was hoping to pursue her PhD in life sciences,” said Al-Zaid.

Essex 1
Essex 1

He added that his niece Nahid Al-Manea was attacked on the morning of June 17, 2014, as she walked toward the University of Essex.

She was stabbed at least 16 times and was found dead in a park in Colchester.

“We are still waiting for an official phone call from the Saudi Consulate in England or the British police. Her father believes that the police are trying to close the case as soon as possible to hide the fact that they were unable to solve it,” said Al-Zaid.

James Attfield, 33, who was found with 102 knife wounds in Castle Park last March. (Courtesy: Essex police)
James Attfield, 33, who was found with 102 knife wounds in Castle Park last March. (Courtesy: Essex police)

He added that the family of the victim suspects that the police are trying to convict a minor for the murder so that they don’t have to try the real murderer since British law protects minors.

Police said a trial would start on April 11, at Guilford or the Central London Court.

Chairman of the International Academy at Essex University Richard Barnard said: “Nahid was a very hardworking and conscientious student and was making real progress. She was very respectable and had the ambition to enroll in further studies. She will be missed by her teachers and colleagues.”

In July 2014, the university announced a scholarship in memory of Al-Manea.

The Saudi Education Ministry also announced that an award for distinguished scholarship students studying abroad would be named after Al-Manea.

This article was first published in the Saudi Gazette on Jan. 25, 2015.