Yemen’s first mobile school Edris brings education services to children in IDP camps

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A Yemeni NGO has launched an education initiative that relies on a mobile school bus to educate children in IDP camps in Yemen where the civil war has entered its eighth year.

Al-Twasul for Human Development converted a bus into a mobile school that offers its education services to 900 children in IDP camps in the governorates of Marib and Hadramawt.

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The first of its kind in Yemen, Edris Mobile School is funded by al-Rahma International in Kuwait. It is equipped with screens, foldable chairs and student tables, awnings installed on both sides of the bus and an electricity generator.

The mobile school aims to educate 900 students during the academic year. (Supplied)
The mobile school aims to educate 900 students during the academic year. (Supplied)



Raed Ibrahim, head of al-Twasul for Human Development, told Al Arabiya that the NGO, which works in IDP camps across different governorates, developed this initiative after it realized that many students had no access to education due to displacement.

The location of IDP camps is far from public schools and families cannot afford the transportation costs, Ibrahim said.

The mobile school, which implements an education curriculum approved by the Ministry of Education, is named after the Prophet Idris who is believed to be the first man to introduce writing to mankind.

It is currently teaching students in an IDP camp in the district of al-Abr in Hadramawt. (Supplied)
It is currently teaching students in an IDP camp in the district of al-Abr in Hadramawt. (Supplied)



It can accommodate 100 students, and it aims to educate 900 students during the academic year.

The school offers classes to students up until fourth grade and grants them a certificate approved by the Ministry of Education, Ibrahim told Al Arabiya, adding that these classes rely on an intensive program to educate students within a certain period of time, such as two months, in order for the mobile school to go to other IDP camps and offer its services.

It is currently teaching students in an IDP camp in the district of al-Abr in Hadramawt in coordination with the executive unit for IDPs camp management.

According to Ibrahim, only one bus has been converted so far in order to first evaluate the initiative. He noted that al-Rahma International, which funds and supports the initiative, is keen on designing projects that meet the needs of the Yemeni society through this initiative, which will eventually target more than 5,000 students a year via five mobile schools.

More than two million girls and boys were out of school due to the conflict in July 2021 and the deteriorating economic conditions, according to a statement by UNICEF.

In its statement, UNICEF warned that the number of children who face education disruption in the war-torn country could rise to six million.

In its annual report submitted to the UN Security Council in January, a panel of UN experts insisted the Iran-backed Houthi militia was continuing to recruit children as fighters.

The experts condemned the use of child soldiers and called on all parties “to refrain from using schools, summer camps and mosques to recruit children.”

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