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Huge waves below surface of Sun observed by NYU Abu Dhabi solar physicist

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A team of solar physicists, led by New York University in Abu Dhabi’s co-principal investigator of the Center for Space Science, has revealed huge swirling waves moving on the solar surface, which extend 125,000 miles below the surface of the sun, according to a press release.

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The study led to the discovery of global oscillations of the Sun, comparable to the 27-day solar rotation period. The oscillations manifest themselves at the solar surface as swirling motions with speeds of around three miles per hour.

The press release said that the oscillations will help establish novel ways to probe the Sun’s interior and obtain information about the star’s inner structure and dynamics.

“The discovery of a new type of solar oscillations is exciting as it allows us to infer properties, such as the strength of the convective driving, which ultimately control the solar dynamo,” team leader Laurent Gizon said.

He led the team on behalf of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the University of Gottingen in Germany, the official Emirates News Agency (WAM) reported Sunday.

Gizon and a team of scientists made the discovery after a decade of observations from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, according to the press release by NYU Abu Dhabi.

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