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Jordanians choose sweets over clothes as they prepare for Eid

Published: Updated:

Market fluctuations in Jordan seem to have forced citizens to prioritize their traditional purchases ahead Eid Al Fitr.

Buying new clothes and getting special desserts are trends commonly done in preparation for the holy feast, which marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

Clothing vendors in Jordan say that business over the past week was considerably worse than usual.

“Last year, I earned around JD1,000 during the last week of Ramadan. This year, I have earned JD200 so far,” Ali Abbadi, a garment seller in Amman’s Bayader area, told The Jordan Times on Tuesday.

The week’s sales have not enticed many customers, Abbadi added.

“There is also a new trend that came up recently,” he said. “My loyal customers decided to buy Eid clothing for Syrian refugees rather than for their children, which also affected my business.”

Saif Ammari, a trader in the upscale neighborhood of Sweifieh, also told the newspaper that his 10-year-old shop has also seen a low turnout this week due to customer’s tight budgets.

“Many people decided to skip buying new clothes in order to meet the expenses of Ramadan and Eid. Also, schools will open soon and most people want to prepare for this season,” Ammari said on Tuesday.

However, sweet shop vendors seemed to be less worried.

A manager of a sweets shop told The Jordan Times that the demand for mamoul— traditional date-stuffed cookies served during Eid -- remained at the peak.

“In the last three days of Ramadan, people start flocking to the sweets shops to buy mamoul in preparation for the holidays,” Azzam Al Azzam said on Wednesday.

“Last year, we sold around 400 kilograms of mamoul and we expect to sell a good amount this year as well,” Ossamah Durah, one of the owners of a restaurant and sweets shop, also said.

Mamoun Yaseen, a customer, said buying sweets and good coffee for Eid is a necessity.

“These are a must, because when people visit us, we serve them chocolate, coffee and cookies,” he said.