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Plans under way to build a replica of Hitler’s WW2 bunker

The original Fuhrerbunker was Hitler’s last headquarters, where he attempted to command dwindling armies that had once conquered most of Europe

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The bunker where Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler lived out some of the last days of World War Two before committing suicide is to be partially rebuilt by a German museum.

The planned replica of the Fuhrerbunker, a large underground concrete complex in Berlin where the Nazi leader controlled his rapidly shrinking empire during his final months, will likely open in the summer in the “Top Secret” Museum in Oberhausen, over 480 km away.

“We’re just in the planning stages – the architects are working on it,” museum director Ingo Mersmann told German news outlet thelocal.de.

However, in order to safeguard against controversy - and to avoid becoming a place of pilgrimage for Nazi sympathizers - the museum is being careful over its design.

The portraits of Hitler hanging on the walls of the original will be replaced by empty black frames in the replica.

“We certainly don’t want to recreate a place for the misguided people who still see him as a hero to come as a pilgrimage. We are planning against that,” Mersmann said.

In addition to using maps, plans and historical photos to help bring the bunker back to life, the reconstructed set for the 2004 German film The Downfall, which depicted the last days of the Nazi regime in Berlin, is also being utilized.

Fatal history

The original Fuhrerbunker was Hitler’s last headquarters, where he attempted to command dwindling armies that had once conquered most of Europe.

Then, during April 1945, with Soviet soldiers just streets away, the Nazi leader committed suicide with his wife Eva Braun, who he had married less than two days before.

An officer then burned both their bodies with petrol, and placed the remains in a nearby bomb crater.

He was quickly followed by the suicide of his long-serving propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels and his wife, who had poisoned their six young children shortly before they took their own lives.

The current site of the now-largely demolished bunker, under a car park in the center of an apartment complex, is marked only by a plaque showing its layout and some historical facts.