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Bahrain launches new ‘cultural passport’

Bahrain’s Authority for Culture and Antiquities launched the new document to encourage the local public and tourism

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Bahrain’s Authority for Culture and Antiquities recently launched a "cultural passport", a symbolic document which includes a guide to twenty-one cultural locations on the Gulf Arab kingdom, aimed at promoting tourism at archaeological sites across the island.

This announcement of the new passport at a ceremony hosted by the Arab Regional Centre for World Heritage, a UNESCO event, held in the capital Manama to coincide with the celebration of World Tourism Day.

The cultural passport can be held by citizens, residents or tourists and will be accepted at different historical, religious, cultural and environmental sites bear like the famed Bahrain Fort, which is historically linked to the Dilmun and Tylos eras.

Another site people can visit with the cultural passport is the old Al-Khamis Mosque, one of the first to be built of the Islamic era.

President of Bahrain’s Authority of Culture and Antiquities Sheikha Mai Al-Khalifa explained that the primary motive behind the issuance of the passport is to encourage the "local public" primarily to visit the cultural and archaeological sites, as well as for tourists who would find the passport helpful in a "fun and a new experience in the discovery of Bahrain."

The distribution of the passport begins on October 1 at the Bahrain National Museum, and the Museum of Bahrain Fort site, and the old castle belonging to Shaikh Salman bin Ahmed Al Fateh, Shaikh Ibrahim Centre for Culture and Research, or the House of the Koran located in Manama.