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In pictures: ‘Low clouds’ phenomenon in Saudi Arabia’s Asir region draws visitors

Published: Updated:

A weather phenomenon where low clouds hang below the mountains is currently attracting hundreds of avid hikers and local tourists in Saudi Arabia’s Asir region this summer.

Climate expert Prof. Abdullah al-Misnad told the Saudi Press Agency that the scientific explanation for this phenomenon is related to the mechanism of formation of fog and clouds.

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“The mechanism of their formation is almost the same, but the fog is directly above the surface of the earth, while the clouds are high in the sky, and because the peaks of the Sarawat Mountains are above 2,000 meters above sea level, some of them are 2,500 meters, and some of them are about 3,000 meters, these peaks are surrounded by deep valleys that sometimes form over them low clouds - when their conditions are met - which sometimes touch the tops of high mountains, such as the al-Sawdah Park,” al-Misnad was quoted as saying.

Al-Misnad said that the fog is a small visible water droplets suspended in the air, and it is considered low clouds directly above the surface of the earth, and the fog is formed by the condensation of water vapor suspended in the atmosphere when the temperature drops to (or) below the degree of dew or saturation (i.e. the temperature at which water vapor condenses), and fog occurs in the lower layer of the atmosphere, i.e. above the surface of the earth and extends to a height that sometimes reaches 1,000 meters. Fog increases in the countryside and near water bodies, and in the wake of heavy rain followed by A decrease in temperature to the level of dew or condensation point.