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Images of starving Yemeni child reduced to bone surfaces on social media

With the lack of food coupled with high prices – many are left with little choice but to resort to eating leaves

Published: Updated:

Shocking images have emerged on social media of a malnourished child reduced to skin and bone at a hospital in war-torn Yemen.

The infant is pictured with his mother, lying on a hospital bed in the Red Sea port city of al-Hudaydah. While other pictures of the child showed him at his home village in Tuhayat District in the al-Hudaydah Governorate – where his ribcage is clearly seen protruding out.

The ongoing war in Yemen, has plunged the country into a serious humanitarian crisis, with hundreds suffering from famine and malnutrition.

With the lack of food coupled with high prices – many are left with little choice but to resort to eating leaves.

The images emerge as the UN Security Council called on all parties in the Yemen civil war to halt all military activity and abide by the terms of a Cessation of Hostilities agreed upon in April.

The council said in a statement issued earlier this week that the humanitarian situation will continue to deteriorate in the absence of a durable peace agreement and urged all parties to resume talks with Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed.

Meanwhile the United Nations World Food Program warned that “at least seven million people - a quarter of the population - are living under emergency levels of food insecurity.”

It is a crisis that has deepened since the civil war broke out, and according to WFP there has been a 15 percent increase in hunger during the past year. The WFP further warns that another 7.1 million people are ready to fall into hunger if the situation does not improve. In 19 of the 22 governorates of Yemen, many are experiencing severe hunger.

The UN has also repeatedly criticized Houthi fighters and their allies of blocking the delivery of desperately needed humanitarian supplies from arriving to areas such as Taiz, Yemen's third-largest city.