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How the papers reported the UK’s EU referendum

Britain voted to leave the European Union, results from Thursday’s referendum showing a 52-48 percent split for leaving

Published: Updated:

As the British went to the polls to decide on the country’s position in Europe a German newspaper took an interesting approach in attempting to persuade Brits to remain in the EU - promising to finally accept England’s controversial goal that clinched them the 1966 World Cup final.

The German tabloid Bild, made the tongue in cheek offer on Thursday as Britons went to the polling stations in what looks to be a close outcome, the Huffington Post has reported.

Germany and England have a long running history post world war two that largely involves football.

German newspaper Bild
German newspaper Bild

So it seemed almost inevitable that there might be some mention of the 1966 World Cup final which saw Geoff Hurst score a highly contested goal, that some argue next crossed the goal line, 11 minutes into extra time.

As well as accepting the controversial goal, Bild also drew up a cheeky list of other promises to Britain if the nation voted to remain in the EU:

The German paper ran an amusing letter that started: “Dear Britain, if you stay in the EU” with a list of ‘promises’:

  • Stop making jokes about Prince Charles’s ears
  • Not bring a goalkeeper to Germany’s next penalty shootout against a British team “to make it more interesting”
  • Willingly provide the villain in every Bond film
  • Come to the Queen’s 100th birthday
  • Reserve sun loungers for Brits at the beach using towels
  • To make Jogi Löw, the German football coach, guard the crown jewels
  • To introduce tea time on the beaches of Majorca


Unsurprisingly the British press have taken a more sober view on the vote - although some still managed to keep the way they voiced their stance on either remaining or leaving the EU relatively light:

Red top tabloid The Sun decided to opt for a movie poster style for its ‘vote Leave’ front page:

The Sun newspaper's front page (Photo: AP)
The Sun newspaper's front page (Photo: AP)

The pro-remain tabloid the Daily Mirror urged voters not to ”…take a leap into the dark” with a view down a dark and apparently bottomless well.

Daily Mirror
Daily Mirror

Meanwhile the Daily Express carried a simple message, telling readers to "vote leave":

Daily Express
Daily Express