Repairs begin on Gazas smuggling tunnels

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The Rafah border crossing with Egypt also remained mostly closed to traffic.

The impoverished enclave's food supply remained stable despite eight days of withering Israeli air assaults aimed at Palestinian militants, but medical supplies were running short.

Workers say the attacks destroyed more than two-thirds of the cross-border tunnels that bring cement, fuel and food - as well as weapons - into the coastal strip blockaded by Egypt and Israel since the Hamas Islamist group began its rule there in 2007.

"We are trying to fix the tunnel in order to return to our normal life which we need the tunnel for work. It costs a lot but what can we do, we have to fix it. For example this tunnel of ours which has been hit it will cost no less that 40 thousand dollars to fix," said Mohamad Aladwan, standing next to the tunnel we works on.

None of the tunnel workers interviewed said they had handled military materiel, and all said they were eager to reopen them for the sake of Gaza's civilians, and their own livelihoods.
Wednesday's ceasefire ended eight days of lopsided fighting in Gaza and Israel that killed more than 160 Palestinians and six Israelis.

For the more than 1,000 wounded Palestinians recovering in hospitals, deliveries of medicine by the World Health Organization and other aid agencies after the ceasefire arrived just in time.

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