The ‘Metal Brotherhood’: Israeli and Palestinian bands rock out

Israeli heavy-metal band 'Orphaned Land' are to tour with Palestinian rock band 'Khalas.' (File photo: AFP)

Sharing a love for music – and head-banging – two Israeli and Palestinian rock bands have joined forces to take a “message of coexistence through rock’n’roll across Europe,” The Guardian reported on Monday.

The Israeli band “Orphaned Land” and Palestinian group “Khalas” both believe that music is above politics, religion and conflict and should bring people together.

Palestinian rock band Khalas performs for an audience in the Palestinian city of Bethlehem in the West Bank on August 4, 2005. (Photo courtesy: salamstock)

Palestinian rock band Khalas performs for an audience in the Palestinian city of Bethlehem in the West Bank on August 4, 2005. (Photo courtesy: salamstock)

The groups have set a mission. They hope to prove that their “metal brotherhood” music can demonstrate religious and political tolerance by coming together and doing what they love best.

An 18-gig tour will be taking place across Europe, where both bands will perform on the same stage, as well as share a tour bus for three weeks, The Guardian newspaper reported.

“We can’t change the world, but we can give an example of how coexistence is possible,” Kobi Farhi, “Orphaned Land’s” lead singer told the newspaper.

“Sharing a stage and sharing a bus is stronger than a thousand words. We’ll show how two people from different backgrounds who live in a conflict zone can perform together,” Farhi added.

“Khalas,” translates to “enough” in Arabic. The Palestinian band’s lead guitarist, Abed Hathut, told the newspaper: “Just because we are Palestinians, people expect us to sing only about the occupation.”

"We are metal brothers before everything," Hathut said about his group's  teaming up with “Orphaned Land.”

 “Orphaned Land” use their music to express their views mostly about politics. “Our music is never about an ex-girlfriend, it’s always about politics,” Farhi said.

In the past, boycotts have been implemented by Palestinian activists who believe these joint ventures spurn the occupation of the 1.5 million Palestinians in Israel.

Last week in Tel Aviv, both bands performed for the second time since meeting at a radio station. During their first meet, they were able realize that what divided them was not strong enough to overpower what united them, the bands said.

“One day our children will form a band together,” Farhi said.
 

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Last Update: Wednesday, 20 May 2020 KSA 09:41 - GMT 06:41
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