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Saudis try to tame Riyadh’s wild dogs

Saudis want to tame these animals to eliminate their danger after local authorities failed to take necessary action to remove them

Published: Updated:

A number of Saudis have decided to tame stray dogs in an attempt to follow the example of Indian citizens who decided last August to train such animals for police use, Al-Hayat daily reported.

The citizens made this decision after they got tired of the sight of dogs roaming many streets at night, posing great dangers to local residents.

They want to tame these animals to eliminate their danger after local authorities failed to take necessary action to remove them.

Several citizens expressed anger and indignation at the sight of dogs traveling on the streets near their homes.

One of the residents of Al-Suwaidi neighborhood, Awad Al-Jabri, said the dogs terrify children, especially late at night when they start barking.

He said: “These dogs can be seen at each and every corner of our neighborhood. They come from the nearby Sudair Valley.

“Our children can’t sleep peacefully at night as the dogs bark into the early hours.” Al-Jabri suggested to his neighbors to find a way to catch these dogs, take them to the outskirts of the city, away from residential areas and tame them so they become docile.

He tried using certain signals he was taught with some dogs and succeeded in making them obey his orders.

Ahmad Al-Amari, who lives in the same neighborhood, called on the municipality to put an end to the danger posed by the stray dogs.

“Authorities should send teams to sterilize and inoculate these dogs so they do not spread epidemic diseases such as rabies,” Al-Amari said.

Rabies reportedly kills 55,000 people every year worldwide, with 95 percent of the victims in Asia and Africa.

Turki Al-Mutairi said he has been seeing these dogs for ages because Sudair Valley is teeming with them.

They go out at night to hunt rabbits and mice in nearby valleys. But, as food resources are dying out and the dogs are barely finding anything to quench their hunger, they decided to travel nearby neighborhoods.

“In fact, some of these dogs are tame and perhaps some of them have been separated from their owners,” Al-Mutairi said.