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‘Eagle eye’ to capture UAE landscape in push for conservation

The bird will carry the world’s smallest action camera in effort to deliver a message to urban audiences on the importance of conserving these animals

Published: Updated:

A wildlife conservation group will release a White Tailed eagle from the world’s tallest tower in Dubai on March 14, in an effort to break the world record for a bird flight from a man-made structure.

The bird will carry the world’s smallest action camera, a Sony ActionCam Mini, from which footage of the United Arab Emirates’ landscape will be broadcast, Freedom, the charity leading the initiative said.

Last week Crown Prince of Dubai Shaikh Hamdan Bin Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum posted on Instagram a video of an eagle soaring over Burj Al Arab hotel.

Through an eagle eye from @burjalarab expect higher on 14 of March #FlyBurjKhalifa #MyDubai

A video posted by Fazza (@faz3) on

Sheikh Hamdan posted a comment with the video saying: “Through an eagle eye from @burjalarab expect higher on 14 of March #FlyBurjKhalifa #MyDubai.”

The planned flight from Burj Khalifa follows other takeoffs from Eiffel Tower in Paris, Tower Bridge, St Paul’s Cathedral, and the ArcelorMittal Orbit in London. They are Freedom’s approach to delivering a message to urban audiences on the importance of conserving these animals.

The French-based charity is working with conservation initiative Save our Species (SOS) and the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in effort to raise awareness of the animals on the IUCN Red List of Endangered species.

The Eagle attempting the flight, named Darshan, is an example of an threatened species, which has been successfully rehabilitated through global conservation programs, and will act as an ambassador for endangered animals all over the world. The eagle, once on the Red List of endangered species, has been saved from extinction.

Birds of prey form a formidable part of Emirati culture and heritage and is a symbol of the Gulf state and over the past three decades, authorities have established laws, and 15 natural reserves, to protect endangered animals.